This morning’s passage is a reminder and example of the power of consolation. As defined by the dictionary, consolation is “the comfort received by a person after a loss or disappointment.” The story of Joseph and his family is nothing if not the story of loss and disappointment, especially that which was experienced by Joseph and his beloved father, Jacob. In the case of Joseph, the loss was that of his father and the disappointment was due to his brothers (Reuben excepted) selling him into slavery when he was but seventeen years old;[1] in the case of Jacob, the loss was that of his favorite son, Joseph, concerning whom his sons had led him to believe had been attacked and killed by a wild animal.[2] But now, at last, after over twenty years of grieving the loss of one another, Joseph and Jacob were about to experience the power of consolation.

As we saw last week, for Joseph the consolation began when he disclosed himself to his brothers. Having done so—and having reassured them that there were no hard feelings on his part since all that had taken place had occurred by way of God’s providence[3]—Joseph “threw his arms around his brother Benjamin” and wept. And then he kissed “all his brothers” as he wept over them as well.[4] Thus did Joseph begin to experience consolation, comfort in being reunited with his brothers after the great pain, loss, and disappointment they had inflicted upon him.

After this poignant reunion, Pharaoh was clued in as to why Joseph had earlier wept “so loudly that the Egyptians heard him.”[5] As stated beginning with verse sixteen of Genesis 45, “When the news reached Pharaoh’s palace that Joseph’s brothers had come, Pharaoh and all his officials were pleased.” Clearly, Joseph continued to be held in high esteem by Pharaoh and all who knew him. Therefore Pharaoh told Joseph, verses 17–20,

Tell your brothers, “Do this: Load your animals and return to the land of Canaan, 18 and bring your father and your families back to me. I will give you the best of the land of Egypt and you can enjoy the fat of the land.” 19 You are also directed to tell them, “Do this: Take some carts from Egypt for your children and your wives, and get your father and come. 20 Never mind about your belongings, because the best of all Egypt will be yours.”

Thus did Pharaoh provide for Joseph’s family who gladly did as he directed as Joseph loaded up their carts with “provisions for their journey,” verse 21.[6] Among these provisions were “new clothing,” verse 22 as Benjamin, his only full brother by blood,[7] received even more for Joseph additionally gave him “three hundred shekels of silver and five sets of clothes.” Additionally, as Joseph’s father had sent him gifts, the best products of the land of Canaan, when he thought him to be governor over Egypt,[8] now Joseph similarly sent his father “the best things of Egypt.” Specifically, as stated in verse 23, “ten donkeys loaded with the best things of Egypt, and ten female donkeys loaded with grain and bread and other provisions for his journey.” Then, as he sent his brothers off, verse 24, Joseph’s parting words to them were, “Don’t quarrel on the way!” The time for quarreling was past; it was now time to rejoice for their family would once again be whole.

The text then fast-forwards to the moment when the brothers arrived at their father’s home in Canaan and exclaimed to him, verse 26, “Joseph is still alive! In fact, he is ruler of all Egypt.” Quite naturally, “Jacob was stunned; he did not believe them.” Of course he didn’t for how could Joseph be alive if he had been killed and eaten by a wild animal over twenty years earlier? But upon hearing their report and seeing the gifts that Joseph had sent, he was convinced. “The spirit of their father Jacob” who had once said “I will continue to mourn until I join my son in the grave”[9] had now been revived, verse 27. Thus did he declare, verse 28, “I’m convinced! My son Joseph is still alive. I will go and see him before I die.” This is yet another illustration of the power of consolation which was able to transform Jacob’s grief into joy.

Now though, as we’ve seen, in the minds and hearts of Joseph and his family, God’s providence, his protective care, had been of a piece with the events that had occurred in their lives, as chapter 46 opens we see God yet again actually speaking to his servant Israel, or Jacob. Beginning with verse 1, “So Israel set out with all that was his, and when he reached Beersheba, he offered sacrifices to the God of his father Isaac.” Previously we’ve seen that Abraham,[10] Isaac,[11] and Jacob[12] had all been met by God at Beersheba. And now yet again, verse 2, “God spoke to Israel in a vision at night and said, ‘Jacob! Jacob!’”—notice the repetition of endearment, the repetition of Jacob’s name by the LORD indicating the intimate relationship they shared with one another. This was now the fourth time we’re told that God appeared to Israel:

The first occurred when he set off for Harran to find a wife—this was his first encounter in Beersheba;[13]

The second was when God told Jacob to return to Bethel and build an altar there;[14]

The third was after Jacob returned from Paddan Aram and God changed his name from Jacob to Israel, telling him to be fruitful and increase in number and promising him that a nation and a community of nations would one day come from him. At that time God also reiterated the promise of land he had made to his grandfather Abraham and father Isaac.[15]

Now since years earlier (during another time of famine) the LORD had prohibited Jacob from entering Egypt,[16] this fourth appearance by God, in which he gave Jacob his blessing and reassurance to enter Egypt, was necessary. As stated in verses 3–4, he said to him, “I am God, the God of your father…. Do not be afraid to go down to Egypt, for I will make you into a great nation there. I will go down to Egypt with you, and I will surely bring you back again. And Joseph’s own hand will close your eyes.” As observed by one commentator, this was a powerful “word of comfort for the aged Jacob” who was reassured that he “would die peacefully in Joseph’s presence.”[17] By these words God reaffirmed his earlier promise and also provided his blessing for this trip to Egypt using words similar to those he had earlier used with his father Isaac at Beersheba.[18] Having received God’s confirmation and blessing, verses 5–7, “Then Jacob left Beersheba, and Israel’s sons took their father Jacob and their children and their wives in the carts that Pharaoh had sent to transport him. So Jacob and all his offspring went to Egypt, taking with them their livestock and the possessions they had acquired in Canaan. Jacob brought with him to Egypt his sons and grandsons and his daughters and granddaughters—all his offspring.” Now although mention is made here of “daughters and granddaughters,” in what follows the focus is on the sons and grandsons borne to Jacob since at this time one’s heritage would have been passed to male descendants.

As recorded in verses 8 through 27, which I’m going to skip, these verses provide a general summary, as stated in verse 8, “of the sons of Israel (Jacob and his descendants) who went to Egypt.” Specifically, it’s a list of the children and grandchildren that Jacob had by way of his two wives and concubines, Leah[19] and her servant Zilpah,[20] and Rachel[21] and her servant Bilhah,[22] respectively. Now despite what is stated in verse 8, not all of those listed were already born when Jacob went down to Egypt—see verse 20 which mentions Joseph’s two sons who were born in Egypt and therefore weren’t part of those who now left Canaan.[23] It’s likely, for example, that at least some of the ten sons of Benjamin listed in verse 21 are future sons. As one commentator notes, offspring at this time were viewed as being present in their parents.[24] As in an earlier list Benjamin had been included among the children that Jacob had had in Paddan-Aram—even though he wasn’t born until later—so too his children were likely born in Egypt, not Canaan. Altogether, as stated in verse 27, “With the two sons who had been born to Joseph in Egypt, the members of Jacob’s family, which went to Egypt, were seventy in all”—seventy being a perfect number arrived at by not including wives or daughters (Dinah[25] and Serah[26] excepting). As noted by one scholar, “The covenant family is represented by the symbolic number of seventy…signifying a large and complete number…. In this group of seventy, the emerging nation of Israel was comprehended.”[27]

Beginning with verse 28, the text notes that “Jacob sent Judah ahead of him to Joseph to get directions to Goshen” and that “When they arrived in the region of Goshen, 29 Joseph had his chariot made ready and went to Goshen to meet his father Israel.” Next we’re provided but a joyous snapshot that is the culmination of over twenty years of separation between father and son: “As soon as Joseph appeared before him, he threw his arms around his father and wept for a long time.” Of course, embracing his beloved father, Joseph wept yet again—for a long time. For his part, upon being reunited with the son he thought to be dead, Israel said to him, verse 30, “Now I am ready to die, since I have seen for myself that you are still alive.” Thus was Israel’s consolation. But this comfort didn’t come from others trying to console him for the loss of his dead son as had once occurred. [28] No, this consolation came from the dead son himself; it came from the son he thought he had lost forever. This is why, having at last seen his beloved son, Jacob now felt at peace about dying. Because his son was alive, he would no longer “continue to mourn” until he joined him “in the grave” as he had once said.[29] Because his son lived, he could now die. Such is the power of consolation.

Now though our passage ends with the literal “consolation of Israel,” that is, with the man Israel receiving comfort from the very son he thought he had forever lost, our New Testament passage also speaks of the “consolation of Israel” but in a very different sense. For this consolation of Israel is about the nation of Israel, not the patriarch. And the one referred to as being that consolation isn’t Joseph, but our precious Savior and Lord Jesus Christ at the time of his birth—this parallel serving as another reminder as to why scholars view Joseph as a type or a symbol pointing to the person of Jesus Christ.

Turning to verse 25 of Luke 2 we read, “Now there was a man in Jerusalem called Simeon, who was righteous and devout. He was waiting for the consolation of Israel, and the Holy Spirit was on him.” As noted by one commentator, as used here the consolation of Israel is a “title for the Messiah” referring to “the comfort that He would bring.”[30] By means of God’s Holy Spirit, Simeon knew that the Messiah, that is, the Christ, had arrived in the person of the baby Jesus. By means of God’s Holy Spirit, Simeon knew that the Messiah for whom he had been waiting was now here. For this very same Holy Spirit, the third member of God’s Trinity, had revealed to Simeon that, verse 26, “he would not die before he had seen the Lord’s Messiah.” Beginning with verse 27, Simeon, moved by this very same Holy Spirit, then “went into the temple courts.” And “When the parents brought in the child Jesus to do for him what the custom of the Law required, 28 Simeon took him in his arms and praised God….” Simeon praised God for the Holy Spirit had disclosed to him that this little baby he now held his arms was none other than the Messiah whom the Lord had promised to send.

The content of Simeon’s subsequent praise—of his prayer, of his conversation with God—follows. He began by acknowledging God’s faithfulness, verse 29, “Sovereign Lord, as you have promised, you may now dismiss your servant in peace.” As was true of Jacob upon seeing Joseph, so now Simeon upon seeing Jesus, felt that he could die in peace. For again, God’s Holy Spirit had made clear to Simeon that the baby he held in his arms wasn’t simply an ordinary human baby, but God himself, the Messiah, the Christ, sent by the Father to be Savior for any and all who believe and place their trust in him.

Simeon’s prayer went on to state, beginning with verse 30, “30 For my eyes have seen your salvation, 31 which you have prepared in the sight of all nations: 32 a light for revelation to the Gentiles, and the glory of your people Israel.” Right there, in the baby held by Simeon, was the one in whom alone is found the salvation promised by God. For Jesus is salvation for both Gentiles—or non-Jewish people—who had never received the Hebrew Scriptures and therefore would be introduced to the Christ for the first time; and he is salvation for the Jewish people from whom his own lineage derived. Jesus is their glory because he is the fulfillment of all the promises God had made by his prophets concerning him.[31] It is only Jesus, whose name means “the Lord saves,”[32] who could deliver all nations, both Jewish and non-Jewish, from their sins; from their indifference to and hostility against God; from their desire to follow their own ways rather than God’s. And, having seen him, Simeon was ready to depart in peace for he, of course, understood and believed that the baby he held in his arms was his Savior and LORD for the Holy Spirit had disclosed this to him even as he continues to disclose this truth to people today.

Is it any wonder then that, verse 33, “The child’s father and mother marveled at what was said about him”? How could they not? Though they had been witness to the supernatural origin of this baby who was born of a virgin by the Holy Spirit who came upon her and whose power overshadowed her,[33] they marveled at the reality of his existence and the power of his salvation. Yet not all would accept this baby as God, as the Savior that he was. As Simeon went on to say to Mary after blessing both her and Joseph, verse 34, “This child is destined to cause the falling and rising of many in Israel, and to be a sign that will be spoken against, 35 so that the thoughts of many hearts will be revealed. And a sword will pierce your own soul too.” Because of Jesus Christ—his teaching, deeds, death, and resurrection—though many would rise by placing their faith in him as their Savior, many would fall by refusing to acknowledge him as Savior and thereby rejecting the salvation he so freely offers. Many of the latter would speak against him, having the very thoughts of their hearts disclosed. And Mary’s soul, too, would be pierced as she later witnessed her son’s death on the cross.[34]

Thus was Jesus rightly identified by Simeon as the “consolation of Israel” though the comfort he provides is available only to those who believe in him. It is available only to those who acknowledge him as God’s eternal Son, sent by his Father into this world[35] in order that the world might be saved through him,[36] might receive the eternal life he so freely offers rather than refuse him and thereby receive God’s condemnation.[37] For God’s Holy Spirit is the means by which he provides comfort. He is, in fact, known as the Comforter whom Jesus promises to send to those who love him and keep his commands.[38] Those who don’t believe will not be sealed and indwelled by Christ’s Holy Spirit but instead are destined to remain in their fallen state due to their rejection of Jesus. For them there is no consolation; there is no comfort; there is only distress and suffering that even physical death will not erase or undo.[39]

Dear sisters and brothers, this is an easy choice. If we desire to know the power of consolation that God so freely and generously bestows,

let us turn to Jesus;

let us cling to Jesus;

let us love Jesus;

let us keep his commands.

For when we embrace Jesus as the Savior he is, he gives himself to us. He gives his very Spirit to us. He seals us by his Spirit as a deposit and guarantee[40] that we are his and that he will never let us go.[41] He indwells us by this very same Spirit[42] who joins us with himself and the Father and with all who believe. For by the Holy Spirit God in Christ bestows we’re enabled to experience God’s consolation, receiving comfort not only from his people, not only from his Holy Scriptures, but from God himself. So let us thank him—and praise him—and give him glory both now and forevermore.

Let us pray.

[1] Genesis 37:2b, 28:Joseph, a young man of seventeen, was tending the flocks with his brothers,…. 28 So when the Midianite merchants came by, his brothers pulled Joseph up out of the cistern and sold him for twenty shekels of silver to the Ishmaelites, who took him to Egypt.

[2] Genesis 37:31–35: 31 Then they got Joseph’s robe, slaughtered a goat and dipped the robe in the blood. 32 They took the ornate robe back to their father and said, “We found this. Examine it to see whether it is your son’s robe.” 33 He recognized it and said, “It is my son’s robe! Some ferocious animal has devoured him. Joseph has surely been torn to pieces.” 34 Then Jacob tore his clothes, put on sackcloth and mourned for his son many days. 35 All his sons and daughters came to comfort him, but he refused to be comforted. “No,” he said, “I will continue to mourn until I join my son in the grave.” So his father wept for him.

[3] Genesis 45:5–9:And now, do not be distressed and do not be angry with yourselves for selling me here, because it was to save lives that God sent me ahead of you. For two years now there has been famine in the land, and for the next five years there will be no plowing and reaping. But God sent me ahead of you to preserve for you a remnant on earth and to save your lives by a great deliverance. “So then, it was not you who sent me here, but God. He made me father to Pharaoh, lord of his entire household and ruler of all Egypt. Now hurry back to my father and say to him, ‘This is what your son Joseph says: God has made me lord of all Egypt. Come down to me; don’t delay.

[4] Genesis 45:14–15: 14 Then he threw his arms around his brother Benjamin and wept, and Benjamin embraced him, weeping. 15 And he kissed all his brothers and wept over them. Afterward his brothers talked with him.

[5] Genesis 45:2: And he wept so loudly that the Egyptians heard him, and Pharaoh’s household heard about it.

[6] Genesis 45:21: So the sons of Israel did this. Joseph gave them carts, as Pharaoh had commanded, and he also gave them provisions for their journey.

[7] Genesis 44:29: 29 As he looked about and saw his brother Benjamin, his own mother’s son, he asked, “Is this your youngest brother, the one you told me about?” And he said, “God be gracious to you, my son.”

[8] Genesis 43:11: Then their father Israel said to them, “If it must be, then do this: Put some of the best products of the land in your bags and take them down to the man as a gift—a little balm and a little honey, some spices and myrrh, some pistachio nuts and almonds.

[9] Genesis 37:35.

[10] Genesis 21:32–33: 32 After the treaty had been made at Beersheba, Abimelek and Phicol the commander of his forces returned to the land of the Philistines. 33 Abraham planted a tamarisk tree in Beersheba, and there he called on the name of the Lord, the Eternal God.

[11] Genesis 26:23–25: 23 From there [Isaac] went up to Beersheba. 24 That night the Lord appeared to him and said, “I am the God of your father Abraham. Do not be afraid, for I am with you; I will bless you and will increase the number of your descendants for the sake of my servant Abraham.” See sermon preached on September 27, 2020, Like Father, Like Son, on Genesis 26:1–33.

[12] Genesis 28:10–15: 10 Jacob left Beersheba and set out for Harran. 11 When he reached a certain place, he stopped for the night because the sun had set. Taking one of the stones there, he put it under his head and lay down to sleep. 12 He had a dream in which he saw a stairway resting on the earth, with its top reaching to heaven, and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it. 13 There above it stood the Lord, and he said: “I am the Lord, the God of your father Abraham and the God of Isaac. I will give you and your descendants the land on which you are lying. 14 Your descendants will be like the dust of the earth, and you will spread out to the west and to the east, to the north and to the south. All peoples on earth will be blessed through you and your offspring. 15 I am with you and will watch over you wherever you go, and I will bring you back to this land. I will not leave you until I have done what I have promised you.” See sermon preached on October 18, 2020, Let’s Follow the Angels! on Genesis 28:10–22.

[13] Genesis 28:10–15: 10 Jacob left Beersheba and set out for Harran. 11 When he reached a certain place, he stopped for the night because the sun had set. Taking one of the stones there, he put it under his head and lay down to sleep. 12 He had a dream in which he saw a stairway resting on the earth, with its top reaching to heaven, and the angels of God were ascending and descending on it. 13 There above it stood the Lord, and he said: “I am the Lord, the God of your father Abraham and the God of Isaac. I will give you and your descendants the land on which you are lying. 14 Your descendants will be like the dust of the earth, and you will spread out to the west and to the east, to the north and to the south. All peoples on earth will be blessed through you and your offspring. 15 I am with you and will watch over you wherever you go, and I will bring you back to this land. I will not leave you until I have done what I have promised you.”

[14] Genesis 35:1–7: 35 Then God said to Jacob, “Go up to Bethel and settle there, and build an altar there to God, who appeared to you when you were fleeing from your brother Esau.” So Jacob said to his household and to all who were with him, “Get rid of the foreign gods you have with you, and purify yourselves and change your clothes. Then come, let us go up to Bethel, where I will build an altar to God, who answered me in the day of my distress and who has been with me wherever I have gone.” So they gave Jacob all the foreign gods they had and the rings in their ears, and Jacob buried them under the oak at Shechem. Then they set out, and the terror of God fell on the towns all around them so that no one pursued them. Jacob and all the people with him came to Luz (that is, Bethel) in the land of Canaan. There he built an altar, and he called the place El Bethel, because it was there that God revealed himself to him when he was fleeing from his brother.[14]

[15] Genesis 35:9–15:After Jacob returned from Paddan Aram, God appeared to him again and blessed him. 10 God said to him, “Your name is Jacob, but you will no longer be called Jacob; your name will be Israel.” So he named him Israel. 11 And God said to him, “I am God Almighty; be fruitful and increase in number. A nation and a community of nations will come from you, and kings will be among your descendants. 12 The land I gave to Abraham and Isaac I also give to you, and I will give this land to your descendants after you.” 13 Then God went up from him at the place where he had talked with him. 14 Jacob set up a stone pillar at the place where God had talked with him, and he poured out a drink offering on it; he also poured oil on it. 15 Jacob called the place where God had talked with him Bethel.

[16] Genesis 26:1–5: 26 Now there was a famine in the land—besides the previous famine in Abraham’s time—and Isaac went to Abimelek king of the Philistines in Gerar. The Lord appeared to Isaac and said, “Do not go down to Egypt; live in the land where I tell you to live. Stay in this land for a while, and I will be with you and will bless you. For to you and your descendants I will give all these lands and will confirm the oath I swore to your father Abraham. I will make your descendants as numerous as the stars in the sky and will give them all these lands, and through your offspring all nations on earth will be blessed, because Abraham obeyed me and did everything I required of him, keeping my commands, my decrees and my instructions.”

[17] Reformation ESV Study Bible note on Genesis 46:4. Although Jacob died in Egypt, he was later buried with his grandfather Abraham and father Isaac in Canaan. See Genesis 50:4–7a:When the days of mourning had passed, Joseph said to Pharaoh’s court, “If I have found favor in your eyes, speak to Pharaoh for me. Tell him, ‘My father made me swear an oath and said, “I am about to die; bury me in the tomb I dug for myself in the land of Canaan.” Now let me go up and bury my father; then I will return.’” Pharaoh said, “Go up and bury your father, as he made you swear to do.” So Joseph went up to bury his father.

[18] See Genesis 26:24: 23 From there he went up to Beersheba. 24 That night the Lord appeared to [Isaac] and said, “I am the God of your father Abraham. Do not be afraid, for I am with you; I will bless you and will increase the number of your descendants for the sake of my servant Abraham.”

[19] Genesis 46:8b–15: Reuben the firstborn of Jacob. The sons of Reuben: Hanok, Pallu, Hezron and Karmi. 10 The sons of Simeon: Jemuel, Jamin, Ohad, Jakin, Zohar and Shaul the son of a Canaanite woman. 11 The sons of Levi: Gershon, Kohath and Merari. 12 The sons of Judah: Er, Onan, Shelah, Perez and Zerah (but Er and Onan had died in the land of Canaan). The sons of Perez: Hezron and Hamul. 13 The sons of Issachar: Tola, Puah, Jashub and Shimron. 14 The sons of Zebulun: Sered, Elon and Jahleel. 15 These were the sons Leah bore to Jacob in Paddan Aram, besides his daughter Dinah. These sons and daughters of his were thirty-three in all.

[20] Genesis 46:16–18: 16 The sons of Gad: Zephon, Haggi, Shuni, Ezbon, Eri, Arodi and Areli. 17 The sons of Asher: Imnah, Ishvah, Ishvi and Beriah. Their sister was Serah. The sons of Beriah: Heber and Malkiel. 18 These were the children born to Jacob by Zilpah, whom Laban had given to his daughter Leah—sixteen in all.

[21] Genesis 46:19–22: 19 The sons of Jacob’s wife Rachel: Joseph and Benjamin. 20 In Egypt, Manasseh and Ephraim were born to Joseph by Asenath daughter of Potiphera, priest of On. 21 The sons of Benjamin: Bela, Beker, Ashbel, Gera, Naaman, Ehi, Rosh, Muppim, Huppim and Ard. 22 These were the sons of Rachel who were born to Jacob—fourteen in all.

[22] Genesis 46:23–25: 23 The son of Dan: Hushim. 24 The sons of Naphtali: Jahziel, Guni, Jezer and Shillem. 25 These were the sons born to Jacob by Bilhah, whom Laban had given to his daughter Rachel—seven in all.

[23] Genesis 46:19–20: 19 The sons of Jacob’s wife Rachel: Joseph and Benjamin. 20 In Egypt, Manasseh and Ephraim were born to Joseph by Asenath daughter of Potiphera, priest of On.

[24] Reformation ESV Study Bible note on Genesis 46:8. As support it notes the statement made concerning Levi in Hebrews 7:9–10: One might even say that Levi, who collects the tenth, paid the tenth through Abraham, 10 because when Melchizedek met Abraham, Levi was still in the body of his ancestor.

[25] Genesis 46:15: These were the sons Leah bore to Jacob in Paddan Aram, besides his daughter Dinah. These sons and daughters of his were thirty-three in all.

[26] Genesis 46:1718: 17 The sons of Asher: Imnah, Ishvah, Ishvi and Beriah. Their sister was Serah. The sons of Beriah: Heber and Malkiel. 18 These were the children born to Jacob by Zilpah, whom Laban had given to his daughter Leah—sixteen in all.

[27] As also stated in the Reformation ESV Study Bible note on Genesis 46:27.

[28] Genesis 37:35: All his sons and daughters came to comfort him, but he refused to be comforted. “No,” he said, “I will continue to mourn until I join my son in the grave.” So his father wept for him.

[29] Genesis 37:35: All his sons and daughters came to comfort him, but he refused to be comforted. “No,” he said, “I will continue to mourn until I join my son in the grave.” So his father wept for him.

[30] Reformation Study Bible note on Luke 2:25. See Isaiah 40:1–2: 1 Comfort, comfort my people, says your God. 2 Speak tenderly to Jerusalem, and proclaim to her that her hard service has been completed, that her sin has been paid for, that she has received from the Lord’s hand double for all her sins.

[31] As the risen Jesus Christ said to the disciples on the road to Emmaus, Luke 24:25–27: 25 He said to them, “How foolish you are, and how slow to believe all that the prophets have spoken! 26 Did not the Messiah have to suffer these things and then enter his glory?” 27 And beginning with Moses and all the Prophets, he explained to them what was said in all the Scriptures concerning himself.

[32] The Greek “Jesus” is equivalent to Hebrew “Joshua” meaning “Yahweh saves” or “The Lord saves.”

[33] As promised by the angel Gabriel, Luke 1:26–35: 26 In the sixth month of Elizabeth’s pregnancy, God sent the angel Gabriel to Nazareth, a town in Galilee, 27 to a virgin pledged to be married to a man named Joseph, a descendant of David. The virgin’s name was Mary. 28 The angel went to her and said, “Greetings, you who are highly favored! The Lord is with you.” 29 Mary was greatly troubled at his words and wondered what kind of greeting this might be. 30 But the angel said to her, “Do not be afraid, Mary; you have found favor with God. 31 You will conceive and give birth to a son, and you are to call him Jesus. 32 He will be great and will be called the Son of the Most High. The Lord God will give him the throne of his father David, 33 and he will reign over Jacob’s descendants forever; his kingdom will never end.” 34 “How will this be,” Mary asked the angel, “since I am a virgin?” 35 The angel answered, “The Holy Spirit will come on you, and the power of the Most High will overshadow you. So the holy one to be born will be called the Son of God.

[34] John 19:25–27: 25 Near the cross of Jesus stood his mother, his mother’s sister, Mary the wife of Clopas, and Mary Magdalene. 26 When Jesus saw his mother there, and the disciple whom he loved standing nearby, he said to her, “Woman, here is your son,” 27 and to the disciple, “Here is your mother.” From that time on, this disciple took her into his home.

[35] See, e.g., John 12:49–50: 49 For I did not speak on my own, but the Father who sent me commanded me to say all that I have spoken. 50 I know that his command leads to eternal life. So whatever I say is just what the Father has told me to say.

[36] 1 Timothy 2:3–6: This is good, and pleases God our Savior, who wants all people to be saved and to come to a knowledge of the truth. For there is one God and one mediator between God and mankind, the man Christ Jesus, who gave himself as a ransom for all people. This has now been witnessed to at the proper time.

[37] See John 3:16–18: 16 For God so loved the world that he gave his one and only Son, that whoever believes in him shall not perish but have eternal life. 17 For God did not send his Son into the world to condemn the world, but to save the world through him. 18 Whoever believes in him is not condemned, but whoever does not believe stands condemned already because they have not believed in the name of God’s one and only Son.

[38] John 14:15–18: 15 “If you love me, keep my commands. 16 And I will ask the Father, and he will give you another *advocate to help you and be with you forever— 17 the Spirit of truth. The world cannot accept him, because it neither sees him nor knows him. But you know him, for he lives with you and will be in you. 18 I will not leave you as orphans; I will come to you.” *Greek παράκλητος, ου, ὁ – counselor, intercessor, helper, one who encourages and comforts; in the NT it refers exclusively to the Holy Spirit and to Jesus Christ (https://www.billmounce.com/greek-dictionary/parakletos).

[39] As Jesus taught concerning the rich man and Lazarus in Luke 16:19–31: 19 There was a rich man who was dressed in purple and fine linen and lived in luxury every day. 20 At his gate was laid a beggar named Lazarus, covered with sores 21 and longing to eat what fell from the rich man’s table. Even the dogs came and licked his sores. 22 The time came when the beggar died and the angels carried him to Abraham’s side. The rich man also died and was buried. 23 In Hades, where he was in torment, he looked up and saw Abraham far away, with Lazarus by his side. 24 So he called to him, ‘Father Abraham, have pity on me and send Lazarus to dip the tip of his finger in water and cool my tongue, because I am in agony in this fire.’ 25 But Abraham replied, ‘Son, remember that in your lifetime you received your good things, while Lazarus received bad things, but now he is comforted here and you are in agony. 26 And besides all this, between us and you a great chasm has been set in place, so that those who want to go from here to you cannot, nor can anyone cross over from there to us.’ 27 He answered, ‘Then I beg you, father, send Lazarus to my family, 28 for I have five brothers. Let him warn them, so that they will not also come to this place of torment.’ 29 Abraham replied, ‘They have Moses and the Prophets; let them listen to them.’ 30 ‘No, father Abraham,’ he said, ‘but if someone from the dead goes to them, they will repent.’ 31 He said to him, ‘If they do not listen to Moses and the Prophets, they will not be convinced even if someone rises from the dead.’

[40] Ephesians 1:13–14: 13 And you also were included in Christ when you heard the message of truth, the gospel of your salvation. When you believed, you were marked in him with a seal, the promised Holy Spirit, 14 who is a deposit guaranteeing our inheritance until the redemption of those who are God’s possession—to the praise of his glory.; 2 Corinthians 5:5: Now the one who has fashioned us for this very purpose is God, who has given us the Spirit as a deposit, guaranteeing what is to come.

[41] Hebrews 13:5–6:Keep your lives free from the love of money and be content with what you have, because God has said, “Never will I leave you; never will I forsake you.”[Deuteronomy 31:6] 6 So we say with confidence, “The Lord is my helper; I will not be afraid. What can mere mortals do to me?”[Psalm 118:6,7]; Romans 8:38–39: 38 For I am convinced that neither death nor life, neither angels nor demons, neither the present nor the future, nor any powers, 39 neither height nor depth, nor anything else in all creation, will be able to separate us from the love of God that is in Christ Jesus our Lord.

[42] 1 Corinthians 6:19–20: 19 Do you not know that your bodies are temples of the Holy Spirit, who is in you, whom you have received from God? You are not your own; 20 you were bought at a price. Therefore honor God with your bodies.; 2 Timothy 1:14: Guard the good deposit that was entrusted to you—guard it with the help of the Holy Spirit who lives in us.